Lucifer: God Johnson

“So this is your big plan for busting us out of here. Encouraging a man to steal underwear.”

As much as I loved this episode, was anyone else left feeling slightly disappointed?

I really wanted Chad “God” Johnson to actually have been God. I know I have stated otherwise in a previous review, but now I’m here, publicly retracting my statement. My previous disinterest in Timothy Omundson playing Lucifer’s father most likely came from my annoyance with Galavant, where King Richard was basically just a cuckolded buffoon. I haven’t watched Supernatural in about eight years and the only other thing I had really seen Timothy in was Psych. So yes, my opinion on his casting was rather skewed. But I really, really loved this episode, and I loved the interactions and on-screen chemistry between Timothy and Tom. I was actually rooting for Chad to really be God, so when the reveal that it all came down to the holy belt buckle/flaming sword handle Chad was wearing, I was disappointed.

I was disappointed that I had been played, and I was disappointed for Lucifer. As he stated, his father had never said any of the things that Chad/God had said to him, and that realisation just made him even more hell bent (rimshot) on enacting his vengeance on dear old dad.

Okay, I’m also going to come out and say it: the Case of the Week was actually enjoyable this week. Not so much the actual case/motive/reveal, but the build-up and everything that happened before we found out that the nurse who had one line the entire episode before she was revealed to be the killer. Eh. The surrounding plots were a lot more interesting that the actual case seemed to disappear within the episode. I honestly forgot that there was an ongoing case this week.

Even though God Johnson wasn’t actually God, he did have a major impact on Lucifer and Charlotte this week: Lucifer realising just how much of a crap father God really is, and Charlotte coming to the realisation that she’s pretty much all alone, and running out of time. I have to agree with Linda, who seemed to believe that when Lucifer thought that God Johnson was actually his father, his need for revenge seemed to divert into a need to get his parents back together, even if he denied it. This was a brilliant episode and it made me appreciate Tom Ellis a lot more than I have been recently. We got all sorts of emotions, and I had stupidly forgotten that Tom has a background in comedy, that I found all of Lucifer’s scenes this week, especially in the ward and while he was drugged by the nurse, to be an absolute riot.

This is honestly one of the episodes that I did not mind rewatching several times to get a proper idea of how to write this review. Sadly, I don’t think simply writing “I loved this episode so much that if it was a human being, I would give it a rose," would actually suffice as a review. It gave us a lot of things going forward into the last couple of episodes, and it answered a lot of questions as well. It also removed a lot of my doubt about the show over the last handful of episodes, and I’m really looking forward to seeing what happens.

Bits and pieces

This was the first episode in a while where Amenadiel and Maze talked, right? And of course, now Maze knows what Lucifer plans to do. Hands up who thinks she’s going to try and stop him?

Maze’s main goal this week was to try and get Chloe laid, even offering to have a threesome with her and the doctor who I actually thought was a patient masquerading as a doctor for most of the episode.

Charlotte and Dan. Still creepy, but less so than before. Charlotte was put through the ringer this week, so I’m going to give her a free pass. I loved Tricia and Timothy together in that dancing scene. Tricia seems to have chemistry with everyone.

Linda freaking out about God Johnson and curtsying to him was really cute. Please, Lucifer writers, get Linda out of her office more!

High Lucifer was a hoot.

Quotes

(There were too many for me to properly write down this week, so I’m going to simply put my favourite here)

Ella: I mean, what if God was one of us?
Chloe: Just a slob like one of us.
Ella: Exactly! Or just a...
Chloe: Just a stranger, on a bus.
Lucifer: My father would never use public transport. That song is completely unrealistic.
Ella: What song?

Six out of five flying pairs of tighty-whities.
---
Morgan India, who is having a really good week this week.

2 comments:

An Honest Fangirl said...

I really enjoyed this episode. The single shot of Lucifer and God Johnson walking through the riot was just stunning.

I'm curious how the belt buckle actually worked. Did it just give the power to heal, or did it also give part of the real God's personality and memories? I'm leaning towards the latter, if only because God Johnson knew about Samael and seemed to know about Charlotte. So I guess my question is: is what God Johnson said to Lucifer "real" or not. Morgan, both you and Lucifer seem to think that it wasn't, and that God would never say that. But if God Johnson had God's memories and personality, then God is actually proud of Lucifer and whatnot, and Lucifer is making the same mistake regarding his father as he is regarding Chloe. (That the feelings involved can't possibly be real.)

migmit said...

I agree. That was a good God, and I also wanted him to be a real deal.

The first sign that something was wrong was, I think, God not knowing his wife is there, on Earth. I mean, it was him (supposedly) who warned Lucifer about her escape at the end of the first season.

Maze doesn't know Lucifer's plan; she knows what Amenadiel thinks is his plan. Which is much worse.

Now, I don't remember if I already said this, but I figured out a while ago what is my problem with Charlotte. She does a very good job, but... a lot of time people remark on how hot she is. And I just don't see it. Same way I don't see much chemistry between her and God (well... I still like to call him that). She is very convincing when she's plotting, or when she writes a letter to her son, or when she does a lot of other things, but close, intimate moments... they don't ring true.