Doux News: October 5, 2014

This Week: That Gum You Like… – This Week in Casts – Books on TV – David Fincher – This Week in Cats


That Gum You Like…
Just might be coming back into style. That is, according to two mysterious tweets from Twin Peaks creators David Lynch and Mark Frost this week:


“That gum you like is going to come back in style” is a line uttered twice in Twin Peaks, and it marks one of Agent Dale Cooper’s big moments of awareness. More importantly, though, it seems to suggest that there may be some sort of Twin Peaks reboot in the works above and beyond the extra-special features on the recently-released Twin Peaks: The Entire Mystery Blu-ray, which included over 90 minutes of deleted scenes (many from the movie Fire Walk with Me). Laura Palmer did promise that something big would happen in 25 years. Maybe this is it.


This Week in Casts

Gillian Jacobs (Community) will star in the Judd Apatow-produced Netflix comedy Love.

• Her former study partner Yvette Nicole Brown (who just left Community) has been promoted to a series regular on The Odd Couple.

Josh Holloway will join former Lost producer Carlton Cuse’s new USA show Colony about “former FBI agent Will Bowman, who lives in Los Angeles with his family while the city is occupied by an alien regime. Will is forced to work with the occupying government to thwart a growing resistance movement.” It sounds sort of awful.

Ksenia Solo (Lost Girl) will join the AMC show Turn, which is apparently still airing.

Dominic Cooper will join the cast of Agent Carter in his role as Howard Stark from the MCU movies.

Tom Hiddleston and Hugh Laurie will join the cast of a BBC adaptation of the John Le Carré novel The Night Manager.


Books on TV

In addition to the American Gods TV adaptation that is currently in the work, Neil Gaiman has even more good news: Ananzi Boys will likely be adapted into a miniseries, too.

John Scalzi is having even more luck. His Old Man’s War series and his hilarious Redshirts novel are both already in development, and now Lock In--his most recent SF novel—has been picked up by Legendary Television.

Matt Smith, meanwhile, has joined the cast of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies in the role of the awful Mr. Collins.

And, because gods, cyborgs, and zombies are never enough, Kim Stanley Robinson’s Mars Trilogy is being developed by Spike TV.

But for me, the best news this week is that Stephen King’s phenomenal novel 11/22/63 will be adapted for TV-style viewing on Hulu (the streaming service that tries so hard to out-do Netflix). It will be produced by Bad Robot.


David Fincher

Perhaps the biggest book-to-screen news this week has been the release of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, directed by David Fincher. The film, which has garnered critical acclaim from everyone but my mom (“It just left me wanting more, and I didn’t like that Neil Patrick Three Names Guy”), has also occasioned a few bits of Fincher hagiography, including this excellent video on Fincher’s directorial style and why it is brilliant:



But the most exciting news for this Fincher fan might be that he will direct each episode of the HBO series Utopia, which is based on the BBC original about “a group of people who have a cult graphic novel that supposedly predicts major disasters.”


This Week in Cats




Josie Kafka reviews The Vampire Diaries, True Detective, Game of Thrones, and various other things that take her fancy. She is a full-time cat servant and part-time rogue demon hunter. (What's a rogue demon?)

5 comments:

Billie Doux said...

I'm excited about Robinson's Mars trilogy on television because I love stuff about Mars. I did read the books, but they were very interesting and dull at the same time. Maybe television will cure the dullness.

Matt Smith, meanwhile, has joined the cast of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies in the role of the awful Mr. Collins. That sounds awesome.

The plot of John Scalzi's Lock-in has creeped me out so much that I decided not to read it. I think I'm getting wussier as I age.

Josie Kafka said...

I read Lock In and liked it a lot. The plot is a basic mystery; the lock-in illness is backstory that leads to the protagonist using a robotic body that makes him, essentially, a superhero. It was pretty awesome.

drnanamom said...

So many new things to read and watch. I am going to have to retire just to keep up! A lovely read as always. Thanks.

Mark Greig said...

It's official: Twin Peaks will return in 2016 with a nine episode mini-series on Showtime, written by David Lynch and Mark Frost and directed by Lynch. Consider me cautious, but excited.

Josie Kafka said...

Screw caution. I'm uncautiously excited.