Teen Wolf: Venomous

"This may make me sound like a bitch, but I’ve always wondered what it would feel like to steal someone else’s boyfriend. I bet it’s a pretty sick rush of power.”

Those of you who are familiar with some of the reviews I’ve posted in the past will know that I’m a sucker for a teen fantasy show. Though I’m happy enough to accept any series that straddles either side of the fence, genre wise, it’s the shows that blend the teen melo-drama with the over-the-top horror that really get me going. 'Venomous' was the perfect representation of the type of series that I love, as the traditional teenage theatrics and not-so-traditional monster hysteria collided in an altogether amazing episode of Teen Wolf that was both exciting and intense.

As I’ve said before, a shortened season has allowed this show to really take its plot movement to the next level. The pacing of the show has been nothing short of stellar so far, and this episode really kicked things up a notch. After divulging all we needed to know about the Kanima, we actually found out the creatures true identity; Jackson. I’m not sure how I feel about this revelation, to be honest. It’s not one that feels altogether surprising, but it’s one that’s still quite a shock, especially in light of what a strong role he has in the series.

Though the episode’s main objective was all about unmasking our resident lizard, it was the setting of the episode’s events that made it successful. Strong teen genre shows tend to let slide the fact that their main characters are still young school students, especially given the heavy extracurriculars that they take on. In some cases it’s fine, but in other instances it makes taking said series seriously a little difficult. Teen Wolf has always kept that issue a part of its ideal, and it’s made the show all the better for it.

From the class room location of Lydia’s big monster test, to that amazing bitch-off between Allison and Erica in the more traditional horror setting later on, this episode felt like it was always making full use of its position in the middle of two of televisions biggest clicks, by blending them together in new and fun ways. It’s characteristic of a team of writers who are only getting stronger as time goes on.

4.5 out of 5 secretly poisoned arrows

Plus

I really had that creepy guy that hit on Lydia a few episodes back pegged as the main culprit, maybe even Matt. It’s strange that we got the most obvious of the suspects as the Kanima.

Who was the mystery man/woman that Jackson locked eyes with in the car? In case you missed it, they had this quote stuck on their car: “Imagination is more important than knowledge” – Einstein. Note that the creepy chemistry teacher made an Einstein reference earlier on in the episode.

He Said, She Said

Ms. Morell: “Lydia, what’s it going to take to get you to open up?”
Lydia: “I don’t know what you’re talking about...I’m as honest and open as a person can be.”

Scott: “Lydia’s different.”
Derek: “I know. At night she turns into a homicidal walking snake.”

Scott: “I’ve a theory: Lydia’s immune and somehow she passed it onto Jackson.”

Erica: “This may make me sound like a bitch, but I’ve always wondered what it would feel like to steal someone else’s boyfriend. I bet it’s a pretty sick rush of power.”

Previously posted at PandaTV.

2 comments:

Johan said...

This episode started my obsession with Teen Wolf. I was at the edge of my seat the entire episode. Rarely have I seen such good writing.

Billie Doux said...

I noticed the double references to Einstein, too. Interesting. I also thought it was a shocker that it turned out to be Jackson; I kept thinking it had to be a peripheral character (and I was hoping it wasn't Lydia because I'm starting to really like her).

BTW, I love the coach. Every scene he does makes me laugh. Jackson often makes me laugh, too, and I go back and forth with sort of liking him and sort of despising him, feeling sorry for him and wishing he would drop off the face of the earth. That's a lot of complex emotions to have about a supporting character, isn't it?