Sleepy Hollow: Sick Burn

"I am so never using a dating app again."

Yes, it's a viral app that's actually a virus. Cute idea, but aren't there several movies about this particular plot? Seriously, I don't watch horror movies at all and it sounds familiar, even to me.

This was, however, a nice episode for Alex and Jake, who were absent from the previous episode but prominently featured in this one. It showcased their deep bond as friends, from the lighter aspect of acting as backup in blind date situations all the way to risking their lives for each other. I wasn't surprised that Jake had noble depths, but it was particularly nice to discover that Alex isn't as flip as she appears. She was even upset about her obnoxious Tinder date burning up with the monster flu, even though she had just met him and didn't like him at all. ("Tinder." Just got that one.)

The focus on Jake and Alex went well with the introduction to the previous members of "Agency 355," the earlier occupants of the vault back in 1814 — Davy Crockett, Sacagawea, a White House slave named Paul Jennings, and Samuel Wilson, known as "Uncle Sam" — and how Wilson died for his teammates during an earlier outbreak of the same monster flu. While I'm not sure I'm interested in 19th century flashbacks to another set of Scoobies on a continuing basis, the historical commemorative selfie and the present day one, with them all saying "prunes" instead of "cheese," was a very Sleepy Hollow touch.

While Ichabod found a letter from Washington leaving him in charge of "Agency 355" and was feeling the weight of leading people who might die for his cause, Dreyfuss revealed his evil plan, which I'm disappointed to report is exactly like Lex Luthor's on Smallville: becoming the president/dictator of a fascist United States, complete with an American flag with a swastika-like symbol, called an "ansa," which symbolizes Dreyfuss' new immortality. Dreyfuss was envisioning a graying, scarred Ichabod in chains at his feet as Dreyfuss drank tea and mocked democracy. This is apparently a genuine possible future for Ichabod, since Molly passed out and had a similar vision of Ichabod's future.



This is probably not a surprise to you guys, but for me, Sleepy Hollow is all about the Ichabod goodness. This time, our most enjoyable Ichabod moments were him quoting The Who's "My Generation," his point about what someone like Jefferson or Lincoln could have done with access to today's social media (possibly a little aside about our current real life prez), and the way he went all crazy preacher, telling people to turn off their homicidal mobile devices. Of course, no one believed him.

The B-plot again dovetailed the A-plot, as Jenny "babysat" Molly and took the opportunity to bond with her over a Buddhist ceremony in which Molly chose a bowl, making her an oracle — which was when she had that vision of future Ichabod. Jenny told Molly that when she had had that ceremony with August Corbin, she herself had chosen a crossbow. Jenny is a warrior, so that makes sense.

While I still miss Abbie and always will, I like the idea that Jenny is attempting to bond with Abbie's successor. There's a nice synchronicity to it.

Bits and quotes:

I liked the very tacky Celtic monster detector that went up on the wall.

Ichabod: "Whilst I am an expert in many fields, I should have acknowledged that you, Miss Molly, are a master of the sacred ritual of the selfie."

Ichabod: "I'm here to investigate a young man who's experienced what appears to be a supernatural seizure."
Alex: "A rash growing up his arms, with glowing tendrils?"
Jake: "Tendril-itis? Please, no. Is that a thing?"

Jake: "If I don't make it out, my complete Wave One Captain Beast Smash Force action figures collection must stay mint, in the box. Forever! No kid's dirty little paws can ever touch them. Understand?"
Ichabod: "You have my word."
That felt a bit overkill nerdy to me.

Two out of four selfies. Or maybe I should go for prunes?

Billie
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Billie Doux loves good television, especially science fiction, and spends way too much time writing about it.

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