Lucifer: Super Bad Boyfriend

"Why do I hate myself so much?"

This episode made me think about why Lucifer is a difficult show to define.

Yes, it's fantasy; it's based on a comic about the Devil solving crimes in Los Angeles, after all. And yes, it's definitely funny, but it's not exactly a comedy. It's not a drama, either. The linchpin is a character study of Lucifer, and his struggle to define himself. Lucifer wants to be better than what he is. While strongly pulled toward hedonism and pleasure, Lucifer wants to right wrongs, to administer justice, which is what he does with Chloe.

Yet, much of this episode (that wasn't about Amenadiel, whom I'll address later) was about Lucifer finally realizing that he hates himself. It was never that he didn't like himself when he was with Eve – that was just a symptom. Throughout this episode, Lucifer kept expressing self-loathing. He finally admitted to Linda that God wasn't manipulating him; that he, Lucifer, brought it all on himself. I actually teared up when he asked Linda, "Why do I hate myself so much?" We all know his wings and his devil face are under his own subconscious control after all, a manifestation of Lucifer's self-hated.

At least this realization is progress. I want Lucifer to realize what we all know he really wants, which is to fight crime with Chloe, and to be worthy of her love. I don't think we're going to get that this season, though, because then the main emotional arc of the show would be over. Right?


Speaking of emotional arcs, Amenadiel's impending fatherhood made him realize that he's not just an ex-angel, he's an African American ex-angel. While DB Woodside did an absolutely marvelous job, it almost felt like this plot was too heavy and serious for a show like Lucifer, although I'd argue that it went well with Lucifer's realization.

That said, it was just like Amenadiel to try on fatherhood for size by helping Caleb, a young man who came to Lucifer for a huge favor – to get out from under a drug dealer named Tahir. Amenadiel is powerful and good, but he is still way too na├»ve about life on Earth, and he got Caleb killed. When Caleb told Amenadiel that he was going to crush being a dad, I could just feel the end coming. That scene at the morgue set to the powerful song "Take Me to the River" made me cry – especially when with a simple gesture, putting his priceless pendant around Caleb's neck, Amenadiel rejected God. I also really loved the moment when Amenadiel went after Tahir, and Lucifer knew immediately what Amenadiel intended, and backed him up. They don't always feel like brothers, but they did at that moment.

Eve had some wonderful moments this time. When Lucifer went all "bad boyfriend" in an attempt to get her to break up with him – beer and snack food, fantasy football, bingeing bad TV, kissing other women – she out-Lucifered Lucifer and did the same, right down to kissing the very same woman. The problem is, after all that, Lucifer still didn't want Eve. We're also getting the interesting message that Maze does.


Maze's little dating vignettes were really amusing and said a lot about what she really desires. Maze outright rejected the woman who looked and sounded exactly like herself, and then blew off a really hot guy with flowers to keep talking with Eve and telling her how awesome Eve is. It's clear as day that Maze is strongly attracted to Eve, while Eve is aware that Lucifer isn't good for her but isn't ready to let him go. Eve and Maze would make an interesting couple, wouldn't they?

And so would Ella and Dan. They had a couple of cute scenes together, the best of which was the two of them awkwardly reciting case details practically in unison. Will this turn out to be more than an awkward sexual encounter at work? I'm not sure how I feel about Ella and Dan as a couple, especially since I get this weird incest vibe because I can't help seeing Ella as a grown-up Trixie.

As usual, the case of the week complemented what was going on with the main characters. It was obvious from the beginning that Lexy "I got into Harvard" was the one to murder Ms. Baez. The point was that, like Lucifer, Lexy's boyfriend Nate allowed evil to happen because he wasn't being true to himself. Instead, he did what his super bad girlfriend wanted him to do.

Bits:

— The opener was really funny with a touch of sad, as Lucifer called in a favor with a doctor but couldn't tell him the truth about exactly what Lucifer wanted removed from his back.

— One of the strengths in this series is watching the unique female characters connect. It wasn't just Eve and Maze this time; Linda and Eve in couples therapy was great, especially since they connected around and despite Lucifer.

— Chloe always wears her hair confined at work, but leaves it loose when she tries to connect with Lucifer personally. Maybe this is where I should mention that I think Lauren German is stunning, even on television where everyone is gorgeous. Especially when her hair is out of the way and isn't softening the angles of her face, her eyes, eyebrows and cheekbones.

— Dan is feeling guilty about outing Lucifer to Tiernan, so he picked a fight with Maze so that she would hurt him, but she didn't. Another continuation of the self-loathing theme.

— Gold acting stars for both DB Woodside and Tom Ellis. They were both outstanding.

Quotes:

Chloe: "He told me about... a prophecy."
Lucifer: "Right. What is it this time? Are frogs about to start falling from the sky or... perhaps winter is coming?"

Lucifer: "How does one specifically say nay to YEA?"

Linda: (to Eve) "You're the first woman ever. It's like meeting a dinosaur."

Amenadiel: "I know who did this."
Lucifer: "I'll drive."

Four out of four celestial pendants,

Billie
---
Billie Doux loves good television and spends way too much time writing about it.

No comments: