Saturn Awards 2013


On Wednesday night, The Academy of Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy Films handed out its annual Saturn awards celebrating the best of the genre. No real surprises, but many of our favorites got a nod this year. The television category, in particular, enjoys great coverage on this site. Without further ado, the winners are:

FILM AWARDS

Best Science Fiction Film: Marvel's The Avengers
Best Fantasy Film: Life of Pi
Best Horror/Thriller Film: The Cabin in the Woods
Best Action/Adventure Film: Skyfall

Best Actor: Matthew McConaughey, Killer Joe
Best Actress: Jennifer Lawrence, The Hunger Games
Best Supporting Actor: Clark Gregg, Marvel's The Avengers
Best Supporting Actress: Anne Hathaway, The Dark Knight Rises
Best Performance by a Younger Actor: Suraj Sharma, Life of Pi

Best Director: Joss Whedon, Marvel's The Avengers
Best Writing: Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained
Best Production Design: Dan Hennah, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
Best Editing: Alexander Berner, Cloud Atlas
Best Music: Danny Elfman, Frankenweenie
Best Costume: Paco Delgado, Les Miserables
Best Make-Up: Heike Merker, Daniel Parker, Jeremy Woodhead, Cloud Atlas
Best Special Effects: Janek Sirrs, Jeff White, Guy Williams, Dan Sudick, Marvel's The Avengers

Best Independent Film Release: Killer Joe
Best International Film: Headhunters
Best Animated Film: Frankenweenie

TELEVISION AWARDS

Best Network Television Series: Revolution
Best Syndicated/Cable Television Series: The Walking Dead
Best Presentation on Television: Breaking Bad
Best Youth-Oriented Series on Television: Teen Wolf

Best Actor on Television: Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad tied Kevin Bacon, The Following
Best Actress on Television: Anna Torv, Fringe
Best Supporting Actor on Television: Jonathan Banks, Breaking Bad
Best Supporting Actress on Television: Laurie Holden, The Walking Dead
Best Guest Star on Television: Yvonne Strahovski, Dexter

HOME ENTERTAINMENT AWARDS

Best DVD/BD Release: Touchback
Best DVD/BD Special Edition Release: Little Shop of Horrors: The Director's Cut
Best DVD/BD Collection Release: Universal Classic Monsters: The Essential Collection
Best DVD/BD Television Series Release: Star Trek: The Next Generation, Season 1 & 2

SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

The Lifetime Achievement Award: William Friedkin
The Dan Curtis Legacy Award: Vince Gilligan
The Visionary Award: Richard Matheson
The Life Career Award: Jonathan Frakes
Theater Showcase Award: Silence! The Musical

6 comments:

Paul Kelly said...

Pleased to see Cloud Atlas, Strahovski, and Torv getting some love, but The Life of Pi? I thought it was an average film.

Billie Doux said...

Personally, I'm thrilled that so many of the shows we love here were so well represented.

Jess Lynde said...

I love Breaking Bad and think it is very worthy of award recognition, but since when is it considered Science Fiction, Horror, or Fantasy? Having tense storylines does not make a show "horror." Wouldn't it have been better to honor something like Game of Thrones as the "Best Presentation on Television" in Science Fiction, Horror, and Fantasy?

Similarly, I wouldn't consider Skyfall or Les Miserables to fall into any of those categories. James Bond is a spy series, and Les Mis is a historical/romance musical.

There are plenty of candidates that actually are science fiction, horror, and fantasy (as evidenced by most of the awards they handed out). I just think it would be nice if they had better kept to the spirit of the awards for all the categories.

CrazyCris said...

Revolution over Fringe?!?!?! SERIOUSLY?! booo!!! :o( (and I enjoyed Revolution! but way less than Fringe, Grimm, Once Upon a Time, Nikita...)

Happy to see Torv getting some love though! :o)

lisam said...

Jesse Lynde, it makes sense for Skyfall to win Best Action/Adventure/Thriller b/c spy movies are included in that category. I suppose you can make the argument that there should not be a a/a/t category, but that's a different argument.

Jess Lynde said...

I would counter that there are plenty of "action/adventure/thriller" films that would more properly be considered science fiction, fantasy, or horror. Isn't The Hobbit essentially an action/adventure film? Aren't any number of summer comic book blockbusters action/adventure?

Not all action/adventure films are SF/F/H. I generally don't consider spy capers to fit the definition. Even if they do often have some fantastical tech or stunt elements (Bond and the Mission Impossible series spring to mind there), they seem a bit more "realistic" to me, and not really the kind of project I would consider "fantasy."

Oh well. This is like when my husband and I argue with the radio about what's "oldies" and what's "classic rock." It's just labels, and not something I should get worked up over. (But I do.) :)