Battlestar Galactica: Kobol's Last Gleaming, Part 1

Sharon: "I'm afraid I'm going to hurt someone. I feel like I have to be stopped."

Secular logic, versus religion and myth. Or not.

That long, opening montage set to classical music was just stunning: Lee and Adama sparring, Starbuck having sex with Gaius (and calling him Lee, interestingly enough), Helo shooting Sharon Two, and Sharon One trying to kill herself. It's scenes like this that have made me such a fan of this show.

Laura decided to risk it all, defy Adama, and break apart the structure of the fleet, all for a "drug-induced vision of prophecy." If this were the real world, it would be different -- but "the scriptures" on BSG appear to be more than just holy books. Which means she may be right about that stupid arrow, and Adama may be wrong.

Gaius got lucky with Starbuck, but he was still jealous of Lee. I don't think it was just Starbuck saying Lee's name at the moment of truth. I think Gaius may be jealous of Lee's upright, forthright personality and lack of ambiguity. And what was with Lee and Starbuck hitting each other? Why don't they just hit the sheets and get it over with?

There were so many good scenes. I think the strongest, after that opening montage, were Gaius talking Sharon into killing herself (why? Is he loyal to humanity after all?) and that subtle scene where Starbuck questioned Adama about Earth.

Bits and pieces:

— Laura's whiteboard survivor number: 47,897. That was before ten people died on Raptor 3.

— Those arms. I finally noticed a resemblance between Edward James Olmos and Jamie Bamber. :) (Yes, they both have dark hair and regular features, and they're the same height, but they don't look much like father and son.)

— More confirmation that Number Six has a physical presence: she actually injured Gaius. I think. Did we actually see the injury, or just the band-aid on his forehead?

— The thirteen tribes left Kobol two thousand years ago? I thought it was 3,600 years ago. Inconsistency? Did I miss something?

Quotes:

Six on Sharon: "Her model is weak. Always has been. But in the end, she'll carry out her mission."
Maybe that's why Sharon shot herself in the mouth, but somehow missed her own brain.

Gaius: "I'm not your plaything!"
Laura and Six, simultaneously: "Plaything?"

Lee, on the Cylon raider: "You ever wonder why everyone calls it a she, but to you, it's a he?"
Starbuck: "It's fascinating, Lee. You should write a paper."

Four out of four stars,

Billie
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Billie Doux loves good television and spends way too much time writing about it.

4 comments:

Patryk said...

Wonderfull opening sequence. Mesmerizing. I kept thinking that Helo will kill Caprica!Boomer and her conciousness will jump to Galactica!Boomer just in time to stop her suicide attempt. The show suprised me and that's another point in favour of BSG.

Sooze said...

It took me almost the entire 1st season to decide that I cared enough to continue watching - and the opening montage in this episode is what did it. Funny, huh? I don't know what it was about it, but I was glued to my seat for those few moments, and it was then I decided that I cared enough about these people to keep hitting "play next episode".

Baz said...

Good first half to the two parter, not sure I would be quick to trust Roslin and a drug induced vision and risk my life to go get a McGuffin from an occupied planet. I'm not what you'd call religious though, so maybe that's why.

magritte said...

At this point in the season, BSG seems to have required almost all of its characters to make a Kierkegaardian "leap of faith". In an earlier episode, we had Baltar randomly pointing at the correct location to target, Lee flying through a space tunnel with no idea where it would lead, now we have Kira trusting the president and literally leaping back to Caprica on the strength of her vision.

I'm not a religious person either, but frankly, the President wasn't presented as a particularly religious person--which is part of why she's convincing. This isn't somebody who's spent a lifetime searching for signs of the final days like some people on earth--it's been thrust upon her. At what point do coincidences become less likely than that an ancient prophecy is actually true? And really, when Adama basically admits to Starbuck that he has no idea where earth is or if it even exists, Kira realizes that they need a miracle to survive. Is it really more plausible to expect that randomly wandering through the galaxy will find you a habitable planet where the cylons won't find you than to trust in an ancient prophecy? They have better tech and far more ships.