Highlander: Blind Faith

Joe: "I don't see how twenty years of doing good deeds begins to cover his tab."

The immortal Kage went from extreme viciousness and the worship of money to a selfless, religious life helping others. But he managed to remain unlikable and uninteresting, anyway.

Why didn't this episode work? Too grim? Too ambiguous? Or was it that Kage wasn't all that interesting or compelling? Probably all of the above. Born again patricidal Matthew and his suicide by cop was surprisingly dull, too. The religious aspects of immortality could be interesting if done well. This certainly wasn't.

I guess the point was that evil immortals can change. Except I think Kage still manipulated people with his resurrection in the hospital. I bet he also manipulated Duncan by showing up unarmed, knowing Duncan wouldn't kill an unarmed opponent. And even if he did spend twenty years doing good, as Joe said, was it enough to redeem him? I'm not sure I care. And I don't think Duncan forgave him. I think he just gave Kage the benefit of the doubt.

Flashbacks:

— 1937 Spain. During the Spanish civil war, Kage turned on Duncan and caused the death of one of Duncan's mortal friends. Duncan, in a beret and that ugly pencil mustache, was again working as a reporter.

— 1975 Cambodia. Kage left a nun and a dozen orphans to die. Apparently, this act was so heinous that it was what finally changed him. I wonder if anyone capable of such an act would be able to change, though.


— Duncan was wearing camo in the 1975 flashback, as was Kage. I thought Duncan didn't fight in wars any more?

Bits and pieces:

— Why do all the injured immortals end up at Anne's hospital?

— Kage/Kieran was the eighteenth evil immortal with a K/C name. He even had two K names. Although I won't count him twice.

Quotes:

Kage: "We're beasts when we kill, men when we judge, God when we forgive."
Duncan: "Maybe God has forgiven you, but I sure haven't."

One star? Two?

Billie
---
Billie Doux knows that there can be only one.

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