Supernatural: Let the Good Times Roll

"Holy crap."

One of the things I've always loved about Supernatural is how faithful they are to their mythology.
Zachariah telling Dean that he was the "Michael sword," Michael's perfect vessel, goes all the way back to the season five premiere, "Sympathy for the Devil."

And may I add, and you can imagine the peevishness in my voice, I really, really wish they hadn't publicized the fact that Jensen Ackles would be playing a new character because I'm sure nearly every Supernatural fan put two and two together and got Michael. Especially since we never did get to know Michael very well. It always felt that they were going somewhere with it, and I'll get back to Dean as Michael further on down the review after I talk about...

Jack and Lucifer

I was so glad that Jack didn't die in this finale, or worse, turn to evil, because it would have negated every shred of positive character growth he experienced this season. Jack is good, and thankfully, he stayed good; he is a positive reflection of Dean and Sam because they gave him the love and support that he desperately needed. Yes, Jack still has some impulse control issues (as poor Nate at the Gas & Go could tell you), but in what could have been his final moments, Jack looked and sounded like a wounded little boy, and he and Sam were ready to die for each other.

It made sense that Jack would need to see the best in Lucifer, that he would be jazzed about a Star-Wars-like intergalactic tour together. They could have ruled the galaxy side by side as father and son, and what a telling little analogy that was, since Jack was seeing Lucifer as a redeemable Darth Vader. All season, they've been flirting with the possibility of Lucifer's redemption, and like Jack, I almost fell for it. Almost.

But deep down, I wasn't surprised by the reveal. Lucifer's interest in Jack was always a passing fancy, a possible new hobby. It took so little for Lucifer to turn on Jack and steal his grace, to use him to play one final death game with Sam. Gold acting stars for Mark Pellegrino who has always done a terrific job giving depth to Lucifer, particularly this season when he had some real ambiguity to work with.


This episode was all about two particularly powerful scenes: the one in the bunker with Dean, Sam, Castiel and Jack versus Lucifer and Michael, and the final smackdown in that very cool-looking random church with the huge, interesting sigil on the floor. Dean's entrance as Michael with the wings was awesome, although the Matrix-like fight in the air didn't do a whole lot for me. You'd think archangels would find a more dignified way to fight each other.

But it was certainly a massive death scene, worthy of a major character like Lucifer. I only wish it had been Sam who had killed him once and for all, although let me quickly add that I'm really, really okay with Dean doing it. This is one death I hope they won't reverse because it was time, more than time, for Lucifer to go.

If they hadn't left us with Dean's body stolen by Michael, I'd be pretty darned happy. Although I must admit that I'm looking forward to seeing Jensen Ackles play the bad guy in season fourteen. In gorgeous clothes, too. It was way past time they got Jensen out of flannel.

This season and next

Apocalypse World, or as Lucifer called it, "Giant Litter Box World" has become one of my favorite Supernatural plot elements, and not just because it was a chance to explore an interesting dystopian alternate universe. (Who doesn't love a dystopian alternate universe?) The best part about it was that it gave them a believable way to bring back several beloved characters that should never have died – most notably Bobby and Charlie. And they survived the season! (I'm so sorry that Kevin did not.)

Mary Winchester made it too, and I'm really happy about that. She's part of the team now. Was I getting a romantic vibes between Mary and Bobby when they were walking in the rain? If so, and if John Winchester ever does come back, that's an episode waiting to happen, isn't it?

I was surprised that the Heaven arc went unresolved, although with Michael on the loose, it will certainly be in play next season. Billie-who-is-now-Death is still waiting in the wings, too. And Sister Jo. Rowena and Charlie are on a ginger road trip together; could we please have an episode about the two of them next season? Bobby said that Ketch was out "doing Ketch things," so he could also return. And I hope that we haven't heard the last of Jody Mills and her Wayward Sisters, too, even though the spinoff didn't go to series.

And yes, I'm still upset that we lost Gabriel. With Lucifer dead, that means Dean/Michael is the only remaining archangel in both worlds… no, wait. The Michael from our 'verse is still in the Cage with Adam Winchester, isn't he? The very same Michael who once possessed John Winchester? Will they finally resolve that huge, dangling plot thread next season? Is this 'verse's Michael the only one who could defeat Apocalypse World Michael and save Dean?

Bits:

— In the beginning, Dean was talking about retirement, matching Hawaiian shirts and drinking beer on a beach. Could we maybe see that next season, even if it's just someone's dream?

— Why was Jack thinking of Mary when he said he couldn't save everyone? He actually did save Mary.

— Jack exhibited a couple of major new powers: when Sam prayed to Jack, Jack heard him. And Jack was able to compel Lucifer into telling the truth about killing Maggie. Awesome and somewhat creepy golden eye effect there. Lots of eye stuff this season.

— Lucifer called Bobby "Longmire."

— Maggie's death didn't mean a whole lot since I barely registered who she was. That might have worked better with a character we knew.

— Fox's show Lucifer was (unfortunately) cancelled this week. We lost two Lucifers at the same time.

— This week: the bunker, and wherever that church was. Castiel was Agent Rowland, Dean was Agent Knowles, and Sam was Agent Williams. Kelly Rowland, Beyonce Knowles and Michelle Williams. Was the all-girl bit a little tribute to Wayward Sisters?

Quotes:

Dean: "My name is Dean Winchester. That big fella's my brother Sam. We kill monsters."
Rowena: "Oh, this is boring. Is there, I don't know, music?"
Possibly the best introduction to "Carry On" they've ever done. I watched it four times.

Sam: (lecturing) "The ice caps are melting, people marching, a little bit of craziness in the movie world, businessman billionaire mogul turned president embroiled in yet another controversy. And that (pause to sigh) is pretty much the world... our world right now."
Bobby: "Let me get this right. The ice caps are melting, a movie where a girl goes all the way with a fish wins best picture, and that damn fool idgit from The Apprentice is president?"
Sam: "Yeah."
Bobby: "And you call where we come from 'Apocalypse World'?"
Sam: "Good point."
And that was also a little callback to Back to the Future where Doc Brown didn't believe that actor Ronald Reagan was president.

Castiel: "I can hear three, maybe four. They're talking about whether Kylie Jenner would make a good mother. The consensus is no."
Dean: "Yeah. Well, that's why I'm a Khloé man."

Werewolf: "…and that is why I'm a Khloé man."

Dean: (to Jack) "You're family, kid. And we look after our own."

Jack: "Sam said you were dead. He said Michael killed you."
Lucifer: "Yeah, I don't like to speak ill of people, but Sam is a big fat liar, and he's a bad person, and, like, freakishly tall, so…"

Lucifer: "About this resurrection stuff, it's not always a great idea because… people come back different."
Jack: "Well, Sam didn't."
Lucifer: "Right. Well, Sam's always been sort of different. Some would say 'special' (glancing at Mary), no offense."
I think Sam has been brought back from death so many times that it's just another day at the office for him. Seriously.

Michael: "And you, Dean Winchester, will be the first life that I take in this world, the first soul I save. Some would consider that an honor."
Dean: "Well, as Shakespeare once said, eat me, dickbag."

Four out of four Peaky Blinders caps. Good job, guys,

Billie
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Billie Doux has been reviewing Supernatural for so long that Dean and Sam Winchester feel like old friends. Courageous, adventurous, gorgeous old friends.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Brilliant finale, and you've covered it all, unfortunately, so there is nothing to add, only thank you. Hopefully, meet you next (hopefully not the last) season.

Austin said...

I wasn't feeling this episode. The wire work in the Dean/Lucifer fight was the worst I've ever seen. It wasn't just because it was obvious, but both Jensen and Mark were clearly struggling to look natural but failed badly. It just really threw the ending off for me. I know there's a small budget, but why does every supernatural being engage in fist fights?

Also, I think Bobby is way older than Mary. Just saying.

Anonymous said...

I agree that fight scene was just...cheesy...but the rest? Loved it. Especially loved Jensen walking down the street in his new duds, looking like a whole new person with Dean's face. Can't wait to see how Jensen does with the new character next season. Also, I'm with you Billie, I'd love to see an episode focusing on whatever it is Charlie and Rowena are up to, and I never thought I'd say that about Rowena.
Sooze

Juliette said...

So glad it wasn't just me who thought of Peaky Blinders! And the wire work was definitely dodgy, they looked like vampires. Otherwise, good stuff, but I'm still pissed about Gabriel.

Patryk said...

Well that was suprising, Lucifer is finally dead. And Michael has Dean's body, that does not seem like a quick reset button in the premiere like demon Dean. Michael should keep him for the entire season or at least half.

I'm glad Jack is still alive, but is he human now?

magritte said...

The joke about Trump reminded me that I read an article a while ago about television watching prefrences of Republicans vs Democrats, and interestingly, Supernatural was a show on the Republican side, while Buffy was on the Democrat side. I was a little surprised because I would have thought Supernatural's take on God and angels would be problematic for a lot of Republicans. And as a liberal who likes both shows, I was curious.

Part of it might just be the gender divide in American politics. But I have to wonder if it's more the urban/rural cultural divide. Buffy takes place in suburban California, Supernatural's setting varies but more often than not, it's in rural America. And it portrays rural Americans much more positively than a lot of other shows. Because if you think about it, characters like who look, dress and act like Bobby are often portrayed as ignorant bigots on a lot of shows.